StP234 Batterie Hamburg M.K.B. MENU

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StP234 Batterie Hamburg M.K.B. MENU

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Battery Hamburg
Oberleutnant MA Rudi Ernst Max Gelbhaar.
250 Sailors.
3/MARINE-ARTILLERIE-ABTEILUNG 260 (some publications state 3rd & others 9th??)
4 x 24cm SKL/40 Guns.
6 x 2cm Flak 30.
6 x 7.5cm Flak M36(f).
1 x 2.5cm Pak112(f).
1 x Tobruk.
6 x Field bunkers.


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StP234 Batterie Hamburg M.K.B. MENU

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StP234 Batterie Hamburg M.K.B. MENU

Details

Work on this battery began in June 1940 by the realization of four open emplacements to receive four naval 24 cm SKL / 40, old guns used on the German cruisers of the 1890s. Previously it was installed in Norderney in Germany, where it had been located since the beginning of the war. To the rear of the emplacements a magazine is divided into three; the first in the centre for the shells, and the two smaller ones for the cordite powder bags and the cases. A barracks located near each gun and two additional bunkers are made on the rear. The bunkers of the four casemates were completed in September 1943. In March 1944 work was slowed by an epidemic of the workers of the Todt Org, but continue nevertheless on three casemates. Flak was mounted around May 1944. The building of casemating the emplacements is slowed again due to lack of equipment. The site gradually ran out of stocks of concrete, reinforcement and the steel beams that were needed to support the roof of the future casemates.

The bombardment of Cherbourg took place on June 25, 1944, when ships from the United States Navy and the Royal Navy attacked German fortifications in and near the city, firing in support of U.S. Army units that were engaged in the Battle for Cherbourg. In doing so, the Allied naval forces engaged in a series of duels with coastal batteries and provided close support to infantry as they fought to gain control of the city. The bombardment lasted three hours to support army units attempting to break into Cherbourg's city streets. The task force was divided into two groups, each consisting of a variety of warships including battleships, cruisers, destroyers and minesweepers. Each ship was assigned a series of land-based targets. German shells were accurate out to 15,000 yards, and in some cases they were able to bracket the radically manoeuvring ships. Several Allied ships were holed, but faulty ammunition hampered German efforts. In several encounters, after being hit the heavy ships were able to withdraw after Allied destroyers obscured them with smoke. After the action, Allied reports agreed that the most effective aspect of the bombardment was the fire that was provided by the small ships. Under the direction of army spotters, these ships were able to engage point targets up to 2,000 yards inland, which proved invaluable in providing close support to the assaulting Allied infantry. In contrast, while the force's heavy guns disabled 22 of 24 assigned navy targets, they were unable to destroy any of them and, consequently, infantry assaults were required to ensure that the guns could not be reactivated. (part from Wiki)

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Initially installed in Norderney in Germany and moved down here in 1940 once the German Navy realised that they could use Cherbourg as a major naval port.

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Initially installed in Norderney in Germany.

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Oberleutnant MA Rudi Ernst Max Gelbhaar and 250 Sailors manned the batterie.

StP234 Batterie Hamburg M.K.B. MENU

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Geoportail ---------------------------------------------------------------------------Plan based on F. Clot with permission

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StP234 Batterie Hamburg M.K.B. MENU

Details

StP234 Batterie Hamburg M.K.B.
StP234 Batterie Hamburg (Souterrain).
StP234 Batterie Hamburg Flak.
Wn406 Viaduct des Moulins.


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